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      Project Gutenberg


        The police have apprehended Lee Man (Aaron Kwok) who is a member of a counterfeiting gang led by ‘Painter’. The police are willing to make a deal if that allows them to capture this mysterious Painter (Yun-Fat Chow), who is proud to be a third generation counterfeiter, a man as capable of charming those around him as he is of ruthlessly killing them if they dare cross him.


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      Burning (Beoning)


        One day as Jong-su (Ah-in Yoo) is delivering a package, he runs into Hae-mi (Jong-seo Yun), a girl who tells him they grew up together. He doesn’t recognise her but she explains she has had plastic surgery. They meet up for drinks later and Jong-su is quietly enamoured by Hae-mi’s alluring personality as she shows him she is learning to mime as she wants to become an actress. She shows him how she’s eating a non-existent tangerine as she explains that the art is not to pretend that there is a tangerine, but to forget that there isn’t one.


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      Can You Ever Forgive Me?


        In the true story Can You Ever Forgive Me, she plays author Lee Israel who made her fame in the 60s and 70s writing profiles and biographies of Katharine Hepburn and Tallulah Bankhead amongst others.  In the early 80s she wrote an unauthorised biography about Estée Lauder, which was widely panned and effectively ended her career. Over the following years, Lee falls on hard times and becomes a broke, lonely and bitter alcoholic.


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      Green Book


        The title of this movie refers to ‘The Negro Motorist Green-Book’, which was a guidebook for black road travellers. It was published by Victor Hugo Green from the mid-thirties to the mid-sixties when discrimination against non-wites was the norm across much of, in particular, the southern US. Green’s book helped coloured people to find accommodations, restaurants and road houses where they would be welcome.


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      The Hate U Give


        One night when driving home after a party, Starr and her friend Khalil get pulled over by the police for unclear reasons. Khalil doesn’t exactly follow the instructions of the police officer, who gets nervous, thinks he sees a gun, and shoots and kills Khalil.


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      Polar


        So first of all you have to go into this movie with the right mindset: it is a graphic novel adaptation, and it is as violent as Jonh Wick, as over the top as Crank, and the lead is played by Mads Mikkelsen. What more can one ask for if you’re in the mood for a fun, brainless actioner?


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      Brexit: The Uncivil War


        According to this movie, the mastermind behind the UK’s historic referendum was Dominic Cummings (Benedict Cumberbatch). He apparently pretty much single-handedly strategised and architected the Leave campaign with razor sharp focus on simple messages. Take Back Control: use the money we pay every week to Brussels (£350m) for the NHS instead, and keep immigrants out. In short form: £350m and Turkey.


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      The Spy Gone North (Gongjak)


        Loosely based on true events, Suk-young Park (Jung-min Hwang) gets recruited by South Korea’s National Intelligence Service in the early 1990s to spy on North Korea’s nuclear programme. He creates a cover for himself as a highly indebted business man who will do anything for money. His mission is first to get close to the director of the North Korean Economic Council Myong-un Ri (Sing-min Lee), who has Kim Jong-Il’s trust. Park patiently works to build his credibility and finally gets closer to Ri, after which the true spy games begin.


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      The House That Jack Built


        Lars von Trier’s latest film takes inspiration from the titular nursery rhyme. The phrase ‘The House that Jack Built’ can have a few different meanings – it is often used as shorthand for a shoddy project or build, and it can also refer to a never-ending endeavour with constant add-ons, often in repeating patterns. Von Trier’s film combines both: it is a shoddy project resulting in two and a half hours of a seemingly never-ending, repetitive tale that fails to excite or even shock.


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      The Old Man & The Gun


        The story of bankrobber Forrest Tucker “is, also, mostly true” according the opening scene. The ‘mostly’ probably refers to the fact that the story we get told is pretty rose-tinted. Apparently Robert Redford is hanging up his acting hat, and The Old Man & The Gun is his final role, so if we take the movie to serve as a vehicle for Bob’s last hurrah then this rose-tintedness may be forgiven. Actually, knowing it’s to be Redford’s last makes the entire movie a bit more worthwhile.


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