Reviews

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      The Wave (aka Bølgen) (6/10)


        If you are in the mood for a popcorn disaster movie, The Wave will do the trick. There are a couple unique elements to this movie. The first is that it is a Norwegian disaster movie rather than a Hollywood one, and the second is that the disaster at hand isn’t one that has been the subject of a movie before (I think). For the rest, it is -very- standard disaster movie fare – but well made and an easy watch.


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      Eye in the Sky (9/10)


        “Eye in the Sky” is not the first film to tackle the moral issues associated with drone warfare – “Good Kill” was one, “Unmanned” another, but it is the best so far. Helen Mirren plays a British colonel leading a complex military operation involving Somalian terrorists. The operation unfolds unexpectedly and she has to decide what to do next under the all too watchful eyes of her immediate boss (Alan Rickman) and a cast of meddling politicians, all anxious to cover their own backsides and avoid taking morally complex decisions at all costs.


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      Mustang (7/10)


        Five girls live with their grandmother in a small Turkish village, enjoying a seemingly carefree existence with friends and school. It soon becomes clear they are too carefree for their local environment: when one day they play and frolic with some boys from school by the seaside, a nosy neighbour tells on them to their grandmother.


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      El Club (aka The Club) (6/10)


        The Club is a group of disgraced priests of the Catholic Church in Chile who have been banished to live in a house of penance in a small town somewhere. They have been banished as they are no longer deemed fit to practice – and as the story unfolds the confessions of child abuse, rape, baby stealing and more make clear why.


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      Martha Marcy May Marlene (7/10)


        After the death of her mother, Marcy (Elisabeth Olsen) longs for a new family which she finds in a community of people lead by Patrick (John Hawkes). As the movie starts, we see Martha run away from this cult and seek refuge with her sister Lucy (Sarah Paulson). The tagline of the movie sets the scene: You can get away, but you can never escape.


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      Remember (7/10)


        The movie opens with introducing Zev Guttman (Christopher Plummer). He lives in a nursing home, where he and his friend Max Rosenbaum (Martin Landau) have made a pact. They are both holocaust survivors and since Max is too weak to leave the home, Zev will track down and kill the man they hold responsible for mudering their families in Auschwitz. This man is Rudy Kurlander.


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      Men & Chicken (Mænd & Høns) (5/10)


        A dark Danish comedy by director Anders Thomas Jensen, Men & Chicken starts out about two brothers, Elias (Mads Mikkelsen) and Gabriel (David Dencik), with some obvious behavioural and social challenges whose father has just passed away. He has left them a videotape, explaining that he is not their biological father, and that they have two different mothers to boot.


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      Posthumous (4/10)


        Posthumous starts out with the premise that an artist’s work is only truly acknowledged and valued after death, and so struggling artist Liam Price decides to fake his own death. Brit Marling plays McKenzie Grain, a journalist whose career isn’t exactly on fire either. She gets introduced to Liam’s work through her art dealer boyfriend, and decides to do a piece on him.


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      The East (6/10)


        The East are an eco-anarchist group undertaking ‘jams’ – eco-terrorist attacks on greedy corporates. Actually, they don’t attack the faceless corporates – they attack their leaders in person, in the belief that an eye-for-an-eye type of revenge will have the most impact.


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      The Visitor (7/10)


        Richard Jenkins is one of those actors most people will recognise but you’re not quite sure what movie(s) you remember him from. He is a strong supporting actor, but in The Visitor he has the one lead role he has ever played in a movie to date – and it earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor.


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