Reviews

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      El Club (aka The Club) (6/10)


        The Club is a group of disgraced priests of the Catholic Church in Chile who have been banished to live in a house of penance in a small town somewhere. They have been banished as they are no longer deemed fit to practice – and as the story unfolds the confessions of child abuse, rape, baby stealing and more make clear why.


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      Martha Marcy May Marlene (7/10)


        After the death of her mother, Marcy (Elisabeth Olsen) longs for a new family which she finds in a community of people lead by Patrick (John Hawkes). As the movie starts, we see Martha run away from this cult and seek refuge with her sister Lucy (Sarah Paulson). The tagline of the movie sets the scene: You can get away, but you can never escape.


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      Remember (7/10)


        The movie opens with introducing Zev Guttman (Christopher Plummer). He lives in a nursing home, where he and his friend Max Rosenbaum (Martin Landau) have made a pact. They are both holocaust survivors and since Max is too weak to leave the home, Zev will track down and kill the man they hold responsible for mudering their families in Auschwitz. This man is Rudy Kurlander.


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      Men & Chicken (Mænd & Høns) (5/10)


        A dark Danish comedy by director Anders Thomas Jensen, Men & Chicken starts out about two brothers, Elias (Mads Mikkelsen) and Gabriel (David Dencik), with some obvious behavioural and social challenges whose father has just passed away. He has left them a videotape, explaining that he is not their biological father, and that they have two different mothers to boot.


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      Posthumous (4/10)


        Posthumous starts out with the premise that an artist’s work is only truly acknowledged and valued after death, and so struggling artist Liam Price decides to fake his own death. Brit Marling plays McKenzie Grain, a journalist whose career isn’t exactly on fire either. She gets introduced to Liam’s work through her art dealer boyfriend, and decides to do a piece on him.


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      The East (6/10)


        The East are an eco-anarchist group undertaking ‘jams’ – eco-terrorist attacks on greedy corporates. Actually, they don’t attack the faceless corporates – they attack their leaders in person, in the belief that an eye-for-an-eye type of revenge will have the most impact.


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      The Visitor (7/10)


        Richard Jenkins is one of those actors most people will recognise but you’re not quite sure what movie(s) you remember him from. He is a strong supporting actor, but in The Visitor he has the one lead role he has ever played in a movie to date – and it earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor.


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      The Man Who Knew Infinity (8/10)


        This film tells the remarkable true story of Srinivasa Ramanujan (played by Dev Patel), who grew up in grinding poverty in Tamil Nadu at the end of the 19th century but proved to have a remarkable gift for numbers and mathematics. Even as a 15 year old he developed his own theorems in number theory, despite hardly any formal education. At 16 he obtained a library book on mathematics and studied it in depth, continuing his researches in his notebooks. He never completed a degree but managed to secure a job in a tax department whose boss happened to be interested in mathematics.


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      The Invitation (5/10)


        Will and Eden were once married, but a tragedy drove them apart two years ago and they haven’t seen each other since. Now, Eden (Tammy Blanchard) and her new partner David (Michiel Huisman) have invited Will (Logan Marshall-Green) and his new partner over for dinner at their house, where Will and Eden used to live, along with about 8 other friends. It’s a nice idea to have the old gang together again, even if there is likely to be some old pain and tension still in the air.


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      The Forest (4/10)


        Sara (Natalie Dormer) has a twin sister Jess (Natalie Dormer again) who was seen entering the infamous Suicide Forest near Mount Fuji in Japan. Sara knows Jess is still alive and travels out to find her. Once arrived near the Aokigahara Forest, she learns that it is filled with the ghosts or people who committed suicide there, but according to a local guide: whatever you see or hear here is not real, it is all in your head…


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