Reviews

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      Elle


        How would you expect a woman to deal with being brutally raped? Undoubtedly there are many feasible scenarios – some more predictable than others. The one that Elle presents probably isn’t one you would have come up with. Paul Verhoeven returns to the essence of his earliest international success with Basic Instinct (1992): provoking the audience with female sexual exploration beyond boundaries most directors wouldn’t venture.


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      Anthropoid


        Reinhard Heydrich was Hitler’s third highest ranking officer, who had earned himself nicknames such as the Butcher of Prague and the Blond Beast. The Czech government was in exile in London at the time, and they sanctioned Operation Anthropoid: to assassinate this animal in Human Form.


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      The Girl on The Train


        The “Girl on The Train”, Rachel, played by Emily Blunt, takes a commuter train each day into Manhattan and back. The train pauses in its journey opposite a house where she sees a seemingly perfect couple, Scott and Megan. Rachel, an aspiring artist, sketches the beautiful Megan (Haley Bennett) from her vantage point of the train carriage.


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      The Wailing


        I can’t say the idea of a Korean horror movie automatically puts a film very high on my viewing list; I have seen enough Korean movies to have learnt that they can have a certain je ne sais quoi though: a kind of wacky weirdness that if, a fairly big if…, but if it clicks, it works. The Wailing is one of those.


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      The Neon Demon


        Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, I enjoyed his 2011 movie ‘Drive’. Sure some of the slow scenes and long pauses and deep and meaningful looks between Ryan Gosling and Carey Mulligan gave it a hint of pretentiousness at times, but that was easily outweighed by the stylisation, imagery and soundtrack. So Refn must have figured he could take those qualities up a notch or two when he wrote and directed the Neon Demon.


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      Hunt for the Wilderpeople


        Ricky Baker gets sent off to live on a farm as his last chance before being sent to juvie prison. New Zealand Child Services take him to live with new foster parents – ‘aunty’ Bella (Rima Te Wiata) and ‘uncle’ Hector (Sam Neill); Bella is the patient one with boundless love for the little boy and Hec is the grumpy one who hates the world and everyone in it. Just as it appears Ricky may sort of be settling in, things go wrong and Hec and Ricky end up on the run together through the New Zealand wilderness…


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      The Girl With All The Gifts


        Ever since George Romero made “Night of the Living Dead” there have been films about zombies, but few manage to be worth watching. Directors have tried applying comedy (“Shaun of the Dead”) and even Jane Austen (“Pride and Prejudice and Zombies”) to the theme, but most efforts plod along as ineptly as the zombies themselves. The Girl With All the Gifts takes a new bite at the cherry.


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      Florence Foster Jenkins


        If you can’t sing, don’t let that stop you from pursuing your dream to be a singer; if you have enough money, you will get to sing wherever you want. Florence Foster Jenkins aims to pay tribute to a woman who couldn’t sing but achieved fame thanks to her devotion to trying anyway; but it is impossible to watch this movie without realising that in the end it only succeeds in being a sad and misplaced celebration of the vanity and self-indulgence of the rich and untalented.


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      What We Do in the Shadows


        What We Do in the Shadows is a documentary (oops, mockumentary) about a group of vampires in Wellington, NZ. It chronicles their lives as flatmates leading up to the annual ball where zombies, werewolves, witches, vampires and other assorted undead and supernatural beings that apparently roam the streets of Wellington get together. It is a very dry and and at times very funny movie.


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      Imperium


        Yes that skinhead on the movie poster was once Harry Potter. In Imperium Daniel Radcliffe finds himself amongst an altogether different kind of Grand Wizards. Seeing him giving nazi salutes in White Power gear is quite a change – and more importantly, he pulls it off.


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