Reviews

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      The Neon Demon


        Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, I enjoyed his 2011 movie ‘Drive’. Sure some of the slow scenes and long pauses and deep and meaningful looks between Ryan Gosling and Carey Mulligan gave it a hint of pretentiousness at times, but that was easily outweighed by the stylisation, imagery and soundtrack. So Refn must have figured he could take those qualities up a notch or two when he wrote and directed the Neon Demon.


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      Hunt for the Wilderpeople


        Ricky Baker gets sent off to live on a farm as his last chance before being sent to juvie prison. New Zealand Child Services take him to live with new foster parents – ‘aunty’ Bella (Rima Te Wiata) and ‘uncle’ Hector (Sam Neill); Bella is the patient one with boundless love for the little boy and Hec is the grumpy one who hates the world and everyone in it. Just as it appears Ricky may sort of be settling in, things go wrong and Hec and Ricky end up on the run together through the New Zealand wilderness…


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      The Girl With All The Gifts


        Ever since George Romero made “Night of the Living Dead” there have been films about zombies, but few manage to be worth watching. Directors have tried applying comedy (“Shaun of the Dead”) and even Jane Austen (“Pride and Prejudice and Zombies”) to the theme, but most efforts plod along as ineptly as the zombies themselves. The Girl With All the Gifts takes a new bite at the cherry.


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      Florence Foster Jenkins


        If you can’t sing, don’t let that stop you from pursuing your dream to be a singer; if you have enough money, you will get to sing wherever you want. Florence Foster Jenkins aims to pay tribute to a woman who couldn’t sing but achieved fame thanks to her devotion to trying anyway; but it is impossible to watch this movie without realising that in the end it only succeeds in being a sad and misplaced celebration of the vanity and self-indulgence of the rich and untalented.


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      What We Do in the Shadows


        What We Do in the Shadows is a documentary (oops, mockumentary) about a group of vampires in Wellington, NZ. It chronicles their lives as flatmates leading up to the annual ball where zombies, werewolves, witches, vampires and other assorted undead and supernatural beings that apparently roam the streets of Wellington get together. It is a very dry and and at times very funny movie.


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      Imperium


        Yes that skinhead on the movie poster was once Harry Potter. In Imperium Daniel Radcliffe finds himself amongst an altogether different kind of Grand Wizards. Seeing him giving nazi salutes in White Power gear is quite a change – and more importantly, he pulls it off.


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      Blood Father


        Between his alchololism, domestic violence, homophobia and antisemitism, Mel Gibson has not made a lot of friends the last decade or two. Aptly his new film Blood Father starts in an AA meeting where we meet him as Link, a man who has done his time in jail and is now living an isolated life as a tattoo artist trying to stay out of trouble.


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      Money Monster


        If you put George Clooney, Julia Roberts and Jack O’Connell together, directed by Jodie Foster, you’d be right to be expecting a pretty decent film. And indeed, Money Monster is just that: a pretty decent film. George Clooney is Lee Gates, loudmouth host of ‘Money Monster’, a TV show where he dances and prances around making wild predictions about the markets and advocating his latest stock picks with great arrogance and fanfare. During a live show, viewer Kyle Budwell manages to slip onto the set, quickly turning it into a gun-waving, bomb-vest packing hostage situation.


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      Now You See Me 2 (5/10)


        I saw the first Now You See Me movie on a plane and was pleasantly suprised. Sure it was a bit silly but it was also just good fun and had a cast-with-chemistry and enough plot to keep you interested. A bit of a guilty pleasure if you will.

        Now You See Me 2 brings more of everything – more action, more plot, more twists, and a couple new characters.


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      Cafe Society (7/10)


        Woody Allen has now made 51 movies, and so by now we have a rough idea what to expect. In his twilight years his recent movies continue to attract top notch actors, and his ear for conversation remains as sharp as ever. The humour may not these be quite as a laugh put loud funny as in his “early, funny films” as he noted in “Stardust Memories’ but he can still write a good one-liner.


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