Reviews

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      Get Out


        This is the first feature from actor Jordan Peele, who both wrote and directed it. His acting career has veered between comedy and more serious fare, such as his role in the hard-boiled TV series Fargo. For his debut movie he has chosen horror as the genre, laced with just a touch of comedy to relieve the tension. Overall this is a terrific film, certainly one of the best, and most thoughtful, horror films to appear in the last few years.


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      Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them


        This first movie in this new wizarding world (there are four more to come) is set in the past in relation to the Harry Potter movies. In 1920s New York to be exact. A lot of the movie therefore is spent on creating this new world and setting out the origins of this entirely new storyline. And it is a lovingly crafted world with lots of fantastic creatures, but unfortunately, it lacks an interesting plot and worse in view of four more movies in the pipeline, it lacks an interesting central character.


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      The Accountant


        You can envision the pitch to the studio now: “like Jason Bourne, but with an autistic accountant.” It is tough to make an engaging movie about autism without Dustin Hoffmann, more so about an accountant. So it is fortunate that the main character is a dab hand at martial arts and high calibre weapons as well as being a whiz with figures.


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      Hidden Figures


        This film tells the story of a group of black female mathematicians who worked on the early NASA space programme. This being a time when the US was still racially segregated, the women had to endure “coloured only” bathrooms and even segregated water fountains while contributing to the space race with the Soviet Union. The film focuses on three women in particular, who are friends. Katherine Johnson is the most brilliant mathematician, drafted in to help NASA calculate flight trajectories in an age when computers were in their infancy and most calculations had to be done by hand.


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      Train to Busan


        We’ve had Snakes on a Plane, now we have Zombies on a Train! As silly as it sounds, putting Korean zombies on a train works a lot better than those mother-loving snakes on that Monday-to-Friday plane, as a censored Samuel L. Jackson would say.


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      The Handmaiden


        Probably not a movie I would typically add to my watchlist just from the description – but it being directed by Chan-wook Park of Oldboy fame, I thought I’d give it a go. And if you enjoy cinema, you should as well.


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      Jack Reacher: Never Go Back


        Never Go Back has very little going for it. With an utterly unremarkable script at the core, and not helped by the directing, cinematography, music or acting, this is a disappointing fail for Cruise, who also produced the movie. Let’s hope he never goes back to Reacher, it’s not worth it.


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      Sing Street


        Oh to be young and in love, in 1980s Ireland… How do you win over the girl of your dreams? Impress her! The fact that you’re the lead singer in a band is surely a winner. But hang on, Conor is not a singer, nor is he in a band… Luckily the naive optimism and creativity of youth quickly solves those minor problems, with a bit of help from various random schoolmates and his older brother Brendan on the one hand, and a bit of hindrance from his parents and the school principal on the other. And so his wooing of Raphina begins…


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      Rupture


        Noomi Rapace plays Renee, a divorced mother who one day finds herself abducted and taken to some secret facility. She soon finds out she is not the only abductee there, but why was she brought there remains a mystery. But she, like the others in this facility, is tied down onto a bed and before long her kidnappers start various ‘tests’ on her; following ‘protocol’, pushing her buttons, but why…? What are they trying to find out…?


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      Nocturnal Animals


        A successful Los-Angeles-based artist Susan Morrow (played by Amy Adams) is sent a manuscript of a novel by her ex-husband Tony Hastings (Jake Gyllenhaal). The story is one of violent abduction and grips her, causing Susan to recall her earlier brief marriage to Tony and the issues that caused it to fail. As the tale unfolds the plot of the novel starts to have subtle parallels with her former marriage…


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