Reviews

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      Cube (8/10)


        I had no idea what to expect from this movie – and I think that is the best way to experience a movie like Cube. It is a low budget Canadian (horror-)thriller that doesn’t rely on special effects (even though it uses some). It succeeds by taking the viewer on the same claustrophobic journey as its actors – you don’t know what is going on any more than they do, and it is hard to predict what is coming next…


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      Autómata (5/10)


        Set in a dystopian future, this is the story of an insurance investigator looking into whether robots have been tempered with, by others or even by themselves.

        This movie borrows (heavily) from Blade Runner, I Robot, and District 9 amongst others, and it starts out quite promising.


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      Headhunters (6/10)


        A Norwegian crime thriller based on a Jo Nesbø book about a headhunter with ambitions.

        Various interesting productions have come from Scandinavia over the last decade or so, but I don’t think this is one of them… The storyline is fairly silly, the characters shallow, and the missed forensic clues must be everywhere… Nevertheless it is a pretty enjoyable watch, but a thriller it is not. It is almost slapstick.


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      John Wick (7/10)


        Could this be one of the few movies in which Keanu Reeves actually appears to act well?

        The director of John Wick, Chad Stahelski, was Keanu’s stunt double on The Matrix, and since worked his way into stunt co-ordinator on movies like 300, The Expendables, and The Hunger Games, and this is his first time as director, teaming up again with Keanu.


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      I Origins (6/10)


        I suspect Brit Marling makes some well-considered choices about what she gets involved in. Mike Cahill also directed her in Another Earth (2011) and I feel a bit the same about both movies: interesting premise, but somewhat frustratingly they don’t quite deliver.


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      Fak wai nai gai thoe (3/10)


        A Thai teen horror movie… Why would you watch that…? Indeed…

        It’s not actually that much of a horror movie, more a drama pretending to be a horror movie and it has a clear if simple concept at the heart of it. Maybe there is also a language issue for me as I found it very difficult to feel any kind of connection with any of the characters so you remain a distant observer and you never get into the story or the characters.


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      Celda 211 (7/10)


        A solid Spanish prison drama. The storyline may not be exceptionally original, but it delivers the premise needed for the actors to do their work: the acting is good and keeps you engaged all the way through.

        There are some caricature prisoners (many of the extras were actual convicts rather than actors) but that doesn’t spoil the story or the overall experience.


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      Tracks (5/10)


        A true story about a strong independent Australian woman on a mission. Except, she isn’t really on a mission. Actually, there is no significance to her journey at all. And along the way, pretty much nothing happens either.

        Shots of camels, grumpy girl, more camels, more grumpy girl, desert, more grumpy girl, more camels, more desert…


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      The Kings of Summer (7/10)


        A quirky and sweet coming of age tale. It starts off a bit slowly, and there aren’t really any surprises or twists, but it is in the end simply a fun flick. Enjoy it for the overall experience, not for the details of the storyline. The three leads are doing a great job and especially Moises Arias is cast well as the weirdo – I felt he came across much better here than for instance in Ender’s Game; not easy as his role is completely over the top yet he makes it feel natural. Nick Offerman also is on good form here. Watch it to relive every teenage boy’s dream of escaping from their parents. And why most actually never do.


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      Wadjda (6/10)


        Hmmm. I should like this movie more than I do. But I don’t.
        A movie received with much critical acclaim, winning a raft of awards, and e.g. a rotten tomatoes score of 99%, sounds very promising indeed.
        But those are all against a background of this movie being from Saudi Arabia, and then the recognition is probably fair enough: it is a place where women have very restricted rights and cinemas are banned altogether, so for a female Saudi director to make the first ever feature length movie completely in Saudi Arabia, and about women’s lives in Saudi Arabia, is not a minor feat.


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