Reviews

  • slide

      A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (6/10)


        This movie is all about style over substance. And stylish it absolutely is. The (black and white) photography is exceptional; every scene is planned for its visuals. And the soundtrack is truly excellent as well. The combination sets out a great atmosphere throughout the entire movie and it is visually and aurally outstanding.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      Gattaca (10/10)


        Gattaca, like all he very best sic-fi, tells a tale yet manages to deal with broader human issues. It is set in a future where discrimination has now become a science, but it is not based on gender or skin colour but on your genetic code, your DNA. Many children in the society portrayed are genetically designed and have any flaws or imperfections designed out by scientists. The world is now divided between those lucky ones whose parents chose or could afford this route, and the rest, who for whatever reason end up being born naturally.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      American Sniper (6/10)


        The real story of Chris Kyle, US Navy Seal and sniper, is remarkable. He was credited with 160 kills in the Iraq War, more than any sniper in US military history. In Clint Eastwood’s depiction this is a man with strong moral convictions, who believes he is defending his country and shows no regret as he skilfully picks off militant after militant who present a threat to his colleagues.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      The Lives of Others (8/10)


        The story of Stasi agent Wiesler, who spies on a playwright Georg Dreyman and his girlfriend actress Christa-Maria Sieland, is a slow one. But one that does not get boring. The tension is built slowly and at times you keep wondering what all the fuss is really about – why does the Stasi care so much about these two people…?


        Continue reading

  • slide

      Lost River (7/10)


        The story of Lost River is at best one of a family trying to keep its head above water against the odds. But I don’t think you should watch this movie for its plot. It is one of those movies you just have to experience for its atmosphere.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      Kidnapping Mr. Heineken (4/10)


        Kidnapping Mr. Heineken It was the perfect crime until they got away with it. 2015Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller Click an icon to see more Overview The true story of the kidnapping of Freddy Heineken, the grandson of the founder of the Heineken brewery, and his driver. They were released after a ransom of 35 million […]


        Continue reading

  • slide

      The Water Diviner (4/10)


        Now how best to describe this directorial debut of Russell Crowe… A pretentious hotchpotch or a melodramatic mishmash?

        Connor (Crowe) is the water diviner, an Australian farmer with the gift to find things deep under the soil. At his farm, he uses this rare skill to find water in drought-stricken Victoria. When his three sons join the battle of Gallipoli in 1919 they die amongst thousands of other ANZAC soldiers. Guilted into action by his wife, Connor travels to Turkey to use his special skill to find the bodies of his sons so he can bring them home for a proper burial.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      Lilting (6/10)


        Junn is a Cambodian-Chinese mother who has lived in England for years but doesn’t speak any English. She is upset with her son Kai who has put her in a retirement home instead of having her live with him. But Kai is too afraid to tell her he is gay and living with his boyfriend Richard.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      Enemy (4/10)


        Despite its mainstream lead, this is an arthouse movie. And a boring one unfortunately… It’s hard to describe why without spoilers – it is one of those movie that needs analysis during and after viewing to make sense.


        Continue reading

  • slide

      The Riot Club (5/10)


        Apparently the Riot Club is (loosely?) based on the real-life Oxford Bullingdon Club, which has had some (in)famous members like PM David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson. It’s that kind of background that brings a level of interest to the movie: the first half or so the boys do an excellent job portraying themselves as proudly priviliged and spoilt twats that you love to hate. And that makes you wonder whether such people and behaviour still exists in the upper echelons of the British social hierarchy.


        Continue reading