Reviews

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      In Order of Disappearance (7/10)


        Stellan Skarsgård plays snowplow driver Nils, who one day finds out his son has died – seemingly of a drug overdose. But Nils knows his son does not do drugs, yet the local police consider the case closed. A tale of revenge follows…


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      Copenhagen (7/10)


        Game of Thrones’ Gethin Anthony plays the highly face-punchable William, an immature and selfish American travelling around Europe with his best friend Jeremy. Copenhagen isn’t on the itinerary by accident: William’s father, whom he feels some deeply unresolved emotions for, was born here.


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      Solaris (7/10)


        Comparing this 1972 Russian classic to modern cinema, it is not an easy watch in that it is extremely slow… but stick with it, as that snail’s pace is an important part of the experience. It allows you to reflect on what is going on, because frankly – it doesn’t seem to make much sense for the first hour and a half or so.


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      Event Horizon (3/10)


        This 1997 space horror film’s premise is that an spaceship (called “Event Horizon”) with a revolutionary new “gravity drive” disappears on its first mission, only to mysteriously return seven years later near Neptune. A rescue/recovery mission is launched, and the film follows the fortunes of the crew of this ship as they explore the vast and seemingly empty ship.


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      45 Years (8/10)


        Andrew Haigh’s low-budget film follows a week in the life of an elderly married couple Kate and Geoff (played by Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay), who are about to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary. They live a quiet life in rural Norfolk, with no children in their life but an Alsatian called Max and a few old friends.


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      Blue Ruin (7/10)


        Dwight is a homeless man who lives out of the back of his car and survives on whatever he can find in the trash – he lost his purpose ever since his parents were killed when he was a child. When he finds out the killer is to be released on parole, he immediately decides to take action…


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      Mad Max: Fury Road (5/10)


        Right from the opening sequence all the way through, this is an amazing visual and aural feast. The cinematography is beautful – every scene and every shot is a sight to behold. The car chases through the (Namibian) desert are insanely spectacular. And the soundstage is all-enveloping. All the things I like in an action movie.


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      The Rover (6/10)


        The Rover takes place in the Australian outback, 10 years after ‘the collapse’. The normal rules of society have broken down, the law is no longer upheld, and individuals are beginning to come to terms with living in world where everyone seems to be free to be judge, jury and executioner if and when they feel like it. It sort of feels it may be taking place well after normal society collapsed, but still a while before it had become quite as bad as in the original Mad Max.


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      Good Kill (6/10)


        Director Andrew Nicoll once again teams up with Ethan Hawke, just like they did in the excellent Gattaca (1997). And like Gattaca, Good Kill raises questions about the impact of technology developments on society at large through focusing on individuals and their personal struggles. This time in the context of warfare.


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      Chappie (4/10)


        There is a lot of promise in this movie on paper – directed by Neil Blomkamp, with Sigourney Weaver and Hugh Jackman on board, it may seem like this movie borrows a bit from movies Robocop or even Short Circuit, but it is trying to be quite a different kind of movie.


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