Reviews

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      Event Horizon (3/10)


        This 1997 space horror film’s premise is that an spaceship (called “Event Horizon”) with a revolutionary new “gravity drive” disappears on its first mission, only to mysteriously return seven years later near Neptune. A rescue/recovery mission is launched, and the film follows the fortunes of the crew of this ship as they explore the vast and seemingly empty ship.


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      45 Years (8/10)


        Andrew Haigh’s low-budget film follows a week in the life of an elderly married couple Kate and Geoff (played by Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay), who are about to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary. They live a quiet life in rural Norfolk, with no children in their life but an Alsatian called Max and a few old friends.


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      Blue Ruin (7/10)


        Dwight is a homeless man who lives out of the back of his car and survives on whatever he can find in the trash – he lost his purpose ever since his parents were killed when he was a child. When he finds out the killer is to be released on parole, he immediately decides to take action…


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      Mad Max: Fury Road (5/10)


        Right from the opening sequence all the way through, this is an amazing visual and aural feast. The cinematography is beautful – every scene and every shot is a sight to behold. The car chases through the (Namibian) desert are insanely spectacular. And the soundstage is all-enveloping. All the things I like in an action movie.


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      The Rover (6/10)


        The Rover takes place in the Australian outback, 10 years after ‘the collapse’. The normal rules of society have broken down, the law is no longer upheld, and individuals are beginning to come to terms with living in world where everyone seems to be free to be judge, jury and executioner if and when they feel like it. It sort of feels it may be taking place well after normal society collapsed, but still a while before it had become quite as bad as in the original Mad Max.


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      Good Kill (6/10)


        Director Andrew Nicoll once again teams up with Ethan Hawke, just like they did in the excellent Gattaca (1997). And like Gattaca, Good Kill raises questions about the impact of technology developments on society at large through focusing on individuals and their personal struggles. This time in the context of warfare.


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      Chappie (4/10)


        There is a lot of promise in this movie on paper – directed by Neil Blomkamp, with Sigourney Weaver and Hugh Jackman on board, it may seem like this movie borrows a bit from movies Robocop or even Short Circuit, but it is trying to be quite a different kind of movie.


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      Dragon Blade (3/10)


        The most expensive Chinese movie ever made, Dragon Blade cannot be accused of lacking ambition. The intent of the story is grand and some of the battle scenes are grander still.

        I went into this movie with an open mind hoping for some spectacle as the scale has awe-inspiring potential. But blimey did they mess this up. The angle to the whole story is incredibly sappy… amplified by a painfully melodramatic score to ‘highlight’ all the emotional bonding that is going on when enemies become allies and Jackie Chan continues to fight for the common good…


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      The One I Love (5/10)


        The One I Love is billed as a ‘comedy’. But I think the real problem this directorial debut of Charlie McDowell (son of) has is that it isn’t quite sure what it is trying to be.

        This is a movie definitely best watched with as little knowledge of the plot as possible, so I won’t explain much more than this: A couple is undergoing marriage counselling, and their counsellor sends them off to a private retreat that will work wonders.


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      Frequencies (aka OXV: The Manual) (6/10)


        This interesting indie movie is set in a world where people resonate at individual frequencies. The frequency is an absolute determinant of ‘Good Fortune’; the higher the frequency, the more good luck the individual will experience throughout their life, and the lower their frequency the more bad luck they will experience. Also, the higher a person’s frequency, the less they feel or experience emotions.


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