Reviews

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      Everest (7/10)


        In 1992, Rob Hall (Jason Clarke), a Kiwi mountaineer, was the first to establish a commercial tourist business guiding (fit & wealthy) amateurs up Everest with his company Adventure Consultants, for $65,000 per person. With such an appealing income, other entrepreneurial mountaineers followed suit, offering the same climb for less money. Hall had a strong reputation for reliability and safety, and amongst the other mountaineering companies was known as The Mayor of Basecamp.


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      The Diary of a Teenage Girl (4/10)


        Minnie (Bel Powley) is a 15-year old girl growing up in 1970s San Francisco. Her mother Carol (Kristen Wiig) is a shallow hippie who spends most of her time not raising her daughter or setting any boundaries, since she is either too drunk or too high, or both. Minnie is a horny teen and keen to explore, but she considers herself too ugly to possibly be considered attractive by anyone. When her mom’s boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård) in one of his many moments of weakness tells he she looks pretty, ever-horny Minnie goes in for the kiss.


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      Experimenter (6/10)


        Even if not by name, most people will have heard of the experiments this movie is about. Milgram was trying to understand how people respond to (perceived) authority and rules when they are given instructions that most people in ‘normal’ circumstances would generally be thought to obviously decline to carry out.


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      Bone Tomahawk (4/10)


        I’ll admit that I haven’t been a big fan of the growing set of genre cross-over movies of the last decade. Movies such as Cowboys and Aliens, American Ultra and even Zombieland always turn out to be disappointing. Bone Tomahawk more than disappoints; it is a bad movie.


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      There Will Be Blood (7/10)


        The movie starts in 1898, depicting the early days of California oil prospecting through the experiences of a Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis). Actually, he initially is a gold miner, but he happens upon the black version instead.


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      Dark Star (7/10)


        The deep space explorer Dark Star, with an original crew of five, has the task of finding unstable planets in alien star systems and destroying them to make way for later colonisation. It is a black comedy, the crew having been cooped up together for twenty years and clearly at the end of their respective tethers in assorted ways.


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      The Walk (7/10)


        It starts off with introducing Joseph-Gordon Levitt as Petit. He narrates from the top of the Statue of Liberty, or he narrates as voice-over, or he narrates in character, but he never not narrates. Must be in case the viewer may miss something of the story. And Gordon-Levitt narrates and over-acts his Frenchness with such aplomb, I can only imagine he modelled his character on Pepé Le Pew himself…


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      It Follows (6.5/10)


        It Follows certainly borrows from classics in the genre. There is a definite John Carpenter feel to the overall plot and to various scenes, channeling in particular elements from ‘Halloween’ and ‘The Thing’. And of course there is the classic horror-movie lesson that Teen Sex Leads To An Ugly Death.


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      Lucy (4/10)


        Scarlett Johansson plays the titular Lucy, a woman who accidentally gets entangled in a drug trafficking deal – and before she knows it, she is a mule herself with half a kilo of CPH4 implanted in her body. As things go wrong, she develops super-human skills, beyond anyone’s imagination…


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      The Guest (5/10)


        Dan Stevens plays David, who is The Guest: a soldier visiting the family of a friend who died in action. The Petersons sort of welcome him into their home, and in a short few days he manages to move from a surprise guest at the door to an almost integral part of their lives, having the best interest of all the Petersons at heart.


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