Archives

Their Finest

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Catrin Cole (played by Gemma Arterton) appears married to a handsome but struggling artist/painter Ellis Cole (Jack Huston), and against his wishes decides to get a job in order to shore up the couple’s frail finances. She is hired as a writer to help the established writing team. Catrin is sent to investigate a potentially stirring tale of a pair of twin sisters who take their drink father’s boat to Dunkirk to help in the rescue, and concludes that, despite some serious issues, the material may make a flagship propaganda film.

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The Handmaiden

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Probably not a movie I would typically add to my watchlist just from the description – but it being directed by Chan-wook Park of Oldboy fame, I thought I’d give it a go. And if you enjoy cinema, you should as well.

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Sing Street

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Oh to be young and in love, in 1980s Ireland… How do you win over the girl of your dreams? Impress her! The fact that you’re the lead singer in a band is surely a winner. But hang on, Conor is not a singer, nor is he in a band… Luckily the naive optimism and creativity of youth quickly solves those minor problems, with a bit of help from various random schoolmates and his older brother Brendan on the one hand, and a bit of hindrance from his parents and the school principal on the other. And so his wooing of Raphina begins…

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Passengers

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A giant starship is on a century-long journey to a recently colonised planet, carrying five thousand colonists plus crew in suspended animation. The ship is highly advanced and is self-repairing and self navigating, so no human crew are required; this ship’s complement will be woken when the ship nears its destination. The film opens when one of them, an engineer called Jim (Chris Pratt) is awakened from his sleep, and quickly discovers that he is not only the only one awake but that there are still ninety years left in the journey. Needless to say, this is unwelcome news…

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Cafe Society (7/10)

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Woody Allen has now made 51 movies, and so by now we have a rough idea what to expect. In his twilight years his recent movies continue to attract top notch actors, and his ear for conversation remains as sharp as ever. The humour may not these be quite as a laugh put loud funny as in his “early, funny films” as he noted in “Stardust Memories’ but he can still write a good one-liner.

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Colonia (6/10)

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The Colonia Dignidad (‘Colony of Dignity’) was a religious cult in Chile, led from 1961 by Paul Schaefer, a fugutive from Germany following accusations of child molestation. The Colonia Dignidad was shrouded in secrecy, with up to 300 residents living in the colony behind barbed wire, working mainly as farmers, and never allowed to leave the colony. Whilst trying to portray an image of peace and order to the outside world, over the years it has become clear that the colony suffered daily incidents of torture, (child) rape, and other forms of physical and mental abuse as a means of ‘spiritual growth’.

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Jewtopia (1/10)

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Christian (Ivan Sergei) wants to marry a Jewish girl so he doesn’t have to make any decisions about anything anymore for the rest of his life; except Chris isn’t Jewish himself, so he asks for the help of his Jewish friend Adam Lipschitz (Joel David Moore) to learn The Ways of The Jew so he can bag himself that Jewish girl (Jennifer Love Hewitt).

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Posthumous (4/10)

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Posthumous starts out with the premise that an artist’s work is only truly acknowledged and valued after death, and so struggling artist Liam Price decides to fake his own death. Brit Marling plays McKenzie Grain, a journalist whose career isn’t exactly on fire either. She gets introduced to Liam’s work through her art dealer boyfriend, and decides to do a piece on him.

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Brooklyn (5/10)

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Brooklyn has three oscar nominations under its belt: Best Motion Picture, Best Lead Actress, and Best Writing. I can understand why it didn’t win, but I am still scratching my head as to why on earth it got nominated in the first place.

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The Diary of a Teenage Girl (4/10)

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Minnie (Bel Powley) is a 15-year old girl growing up in 1970s San Francisco. Her mother Carol (Kristen Wiig) is a shallow hippie who spends most of her time not raising her daughter or setting any boundaries, since she is either too drunk or too high, or both. Minnie is a horny teen and keen to explore, but she considers herself too ugly to possibly be considered attractive by anyone. When her mom’s boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård) in one of his many moments of weakness tells he she looks pretty, ever-horny Minnie goes in for the kiss.

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